Finishing BattleTop

Okay, the title is about as uninspired as topping a vanilla ice cream dessert with chocolate sauce. But it’s to the point! Also, with slight OCD, it’s nice that my archives will show nicely aligned “Finishing …” titles. This is important for many reasons!

BattleTop ThumbnailAnyhow, as I’ve announced recently, I had already finished wrapped up one project: BattleTop. Have a peek at the Source, or check out the Live Version.

Elevator Pitch

What would’ve been the Elevator Pitch if I had made one when I started? Something like this:

I’m developing an app for keeping combat initiative so tabletop RPG groups can skip the tedious parts and share the initiative state easily, using (mobile) devices that are present in sessions anyways.

Writing elevator pitches is far from my specialty, perhaps I should’ve said something about “the competition” too: I’ve actually looked for existing apps, and tried a few from the Android Play Store. Only a few existed at the time, and they were very unsatisfactory.

What’s it built with?

I’ll be honest: from the subset of suitable technologies, I didn’t choose based on “best for the job”. Instead, I chose two technologies that I wanted to learn more about, and stayed in my comfort zone when choosing the rest.

The initial prototype was built with:

  • Html5, because at the time I loved tinkering with the new semantic tags. Also, I intended to learn all about tinker with LocalStorage for saving state between (possibly accidental) page refreshes.
  • Custom CSS, because it’s “good enough” for a prototype, and switching to SASS or LESS later on is easy.
  • jQuery, because I thought I wanted to learn how to write jQuery plugins.

Only two days / 11 commits after I had started did I branch off to rewrite things MVVM style with KnockoutJS. I’ve not looked back since. It also paved the way for easy unit testing, allowing me to experiment with QUnit.

How’s it wrapped up?

The frequency with which our group did RPG sessions had dropped dramatically. This removes the need to have a tool, the motivation to keep developing it, and the ability to test it. And this is okay with me. I learned some cool new things, and heck: it even got it to a functional beta version.

To wrap it up I just reviewed all of my code. Unit tests had already been done in August, and even though the code isn’t the fanciest ever, it didn’t have any obvious loose ends or idiotic bugs. So after some minor changes I just added a “discontinued” warning to the code, the live version, and the project site, and that’s that: closure!

Any future for BattleTop?

Not very likely. I think I prefer to focus effort on one certain other project, and after that probably even start new projects before picking up BattleTop again.

But like I said: I’m okay with that.